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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • Botany

    FRI-624 THE USE OF A TRADITIONAL ENDEMIC HAWAIIAN MEDICINAL PLANT, EUPHORBIA MULTIFORMIS (EUPHORBIACEAE), TO TREAT MENSTRUAL-RELATED DEBILITIES

    • Lindsey Watanabe ;
    • Maria Petelo ;
    • Michael Ross ;

    FRI-624

    THE USE OF A TRADITIONAL ENDEMIC HAWAIIAN MEDICINAL PLANT, EUPHORBIA MULTIFORMIS (EUPHORBIACEAE), TO TREAT MENSTRUAL-RELATED DEBILITIES

    Lindsey Watanabe, Maria Petelo, Michael Ross.

    College of Arts and Sciences, Kapiolani Community College, Honolulu, HI.

    Euphorbia multiformis is a plant endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. In lelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language) it is known as ‘akoko (blood). The leaves of this plant have been used traditionally to treat female health problems for hundreds of generations. As the leaves of ‘akoko mature, the color pigmentation changes from green to yellow and finally red before the leaves abcise. Traditionally, the red colored leaves of ‘akoko are made into a tea and consumed to treat women’s menstrual pains and pregnancy-related debilities. Many of these types of problems are known to be caused by iron deficiencies. Therefore, we hypothesized that the red leaves of ‘akoko are higher in iron than that of any other color phase. In the first part of this study, the leaves of each color phase were collected and the concentration of iron was analyzed using spectrophotometric methods. The results suggest that iron is significantly higher in the red leaves. Additionally, we compared the iron levels in a related species, Euphorbia celastroides, which was not known to have been used traditionally. We hypothesized that the iron levels will be highest in E. multiformis since it was used most extensively by native Hawaiian medical practitioners.

    FRI-632 FOLIAR UPTAKE CAPACITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PLANTS IN COASTAL AND INLAND FOG SYSTEMS

    • Nathan Vega ;
    • Joseph Gamez ;
    • Jordan Abney ;
    • Stacy Schkoda ;
    • Austin Xu ;
    • Darren Sandquist ;
    • William Hoese ;

    FRI-632

    FOLIAR UPTAKE CAPACITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PLANTS IN COASTAL AND INLAND FOG SYSTEMS

    Nathan Vega, Joseph Gamez, Jordan Abney, Stacy Schkoda, Austin Xu, Darren Sandquist, William Hoese.

    California State University, Fullerton, Fullerton, CA.

    Plants absorb water left on leaf surfaces from rain, dew, and fog via foliar uptake. In some species, foliar uptake capacity varies in proportion to fog frequency and duration. Southern California experiences intermittent fog during the dry season, possibly reducing water stress through foliar uptake in local plants. To determine if there were differences in foliar uptake between coastal and inland plant communities, we sampled at Alta Laguna, California (<1mi. inland) and Trabuco Canyon, California (~15 mi. inland). We sampled Malosma laurina (laurel sumac), Salvia mellifera (black sage), Heteromeles arbutifolia (toyon), and Quercus agrifolia (coast live oak) because they were common native plants found at both sites. We hypothesized that plants at Alta Laguna would absorb significantly higher amounts of water through foliar uptake since coastal areas experience a higher fog frequency and duration than inland regions. Leaves were weighed, misted, and incubated in a chamber at 100% humidity with control leaves subjected to the same treatment without misting. After incubation the leaves were weighed to determine if absorption had occurred. Water potential was measured before and after incubation. Toyon at Starr Ranch, laurel sumac at both locations, and black sage at Alta Laguna performed foliar uptake. At both locations, toyon showed a significant increase in water potential post-incubation. There was no difference in foliar uptake capacity between areas with varying fog frequency and duration. Several species performed foliar uptake, and as temperatures increase and fog frequency and duration decrease, these plants may lose access to water in the dry season.

    FRI-626 DNA FINGERPRINTING TECHNIQUES FOR IDENTIFICATION OF ASTRAGALUS AND OXYTROPIS IN LOCOWEED

    • Moticha Yellowman ;
    • Deana Baucom ;
    • Rebecca Creamer ;

    FRI-626

    DNA FINGERPRINTING TECHNIQUES FOR IDENTIFICATION OF ASTRAGALUS AND OXYTROPIS IN LOCOWEED

    Moticha Yellowman, Deana Baucom, Rebecca Creamer.

    New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM.

    Locoweeds are plants in the genera Astragalus and Oxytropis that are poisonous to livestock and wildlife in North America and Asia. The plants contain a fungus that produces the toxic alkaloid swainsonine. The fungal species belong to the genus Undifilum and differing species of the fungus appear to have specific associations with their host species. However, because identifying the plants using traditional morphological methods is insufficient when whole plant samples cannot be collected, the development of new analysis methods is necessary for furthering our understanding of the locoweed and fungus relationship. In order to identify the species and varieties of locoweed plants, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based DNA fingerprinting techniques were conducted on 8 species of Astragalus and 2 species of Oxytropis to determine viability for use as molecular markers for identification. Using a variety of primers, simple sequence repeat (SSR) PCR and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR was performed. DNA fingerprinting banding patterns were then compared to see if they differentiated between the locoweed species and varieties. A single RAPD primer producing a unique DNA fingerprint for different plant species was identified.

    FRI-633 PERFORMANCE COMPARISONS OF CO-OCCURRING NATIVE BACCHARIS AND INVASIVE DELAIREA ODORATA

    • Samuel Reveles Jr ;
    • Christine Case ;

    FRI-633

    PERFORMANCE COMPARISONS OF CO-OCCURRING NATIVE BACCHARIS AND INVASIVE DELAIREA ODORATA

    Samuel Reveles Jr, Christine Case.

    Skyline College, San Bruno, CA.

    Delairea odorata (Cape ivy) is an ornamental vine native to South Africa, which has escaped and is invading natural areas in Australia, Europe, and the U.S. It is a serious pest that currently occupies over 500,000 acres of California. This perennial vine climbs over native species blocking their light source. This rapidly growing invasive plant raises questions and calls for research into how it survives so well in an alien environment and if it will be as successful in the future as atmospheric CO2 increases. Our objective was to determine whether Delairea has a performance (physiological) advantage in shade and increasing CO2. We compared photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and intracellular CO2 rates of Delairea with co-occurring native Baccharis pilularis. In situ measurements were taken with the LiCor-6400 Portable Photosynthesis System. We recorded the different rates under various levels of applied CO2 ranging from 200 to 800 µmols/mol in increments of 50 and at 800 to 2000 µmol photons/m2/s. Baccharis’ photosynthesis is greater than Delairea in all conditions tested (p < 0.01). However, compared to Baccharis, Delairea has a significantly lower transpiration rate in lower light and higher intracellular CO2 at higher atmospheric CO2 partial pressure (p < 0.01). Our findings suggest Delairea thrives in the shade it creates and that the more robust leaf gas-exchange characteristics of Delairea in response to external CO2 partial pressure may enhance its competitive success over co-occurring native species with increasing atmospheric CO2.

    FRI-635 XANTHOPHYLL ANALYSIS OF HIGH DESERT TREES

    • Theresa Garcia ;
    • David Hanson ;

    FRI-635

    XANTHOPHYLL ANALYSIS OF HIGH DESERT TREES

    Theresa Garcia, David Hanson.

    The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.

    Xanthophylls are light sensitive plant pigments that help compensate for free radicals by dissipating excess absorbed light energy. Light is a necessity for plant survival, but too much light can generate oxygen reactive species that can damage or even kill a plant. Plants adjust their light harvesting complexes to optimize light use, but this process is slow relative to daily environmental variation and the onset of stress. Xanthophylls can convert to light dissipating forms within minutes, so they provide a lot of flexibility plants need. Very little research has been done to explore these compounds in native New Mexican species Juniperus monosperma, and Pinus edulis, which grow in high light, upper elevations, and regularly experience drought. We developed a rapid and improved separation and analysis of the xanthophylls, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, through ultra-high-pressure supercritical fluid chromatography. We then used this method to compare xanthophyll composition of both species grown under heat, drought, and combined heat and drought conditions.

    THU-626 STEM CONTRIBUTION TO NET PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN POPULUS DELTOIDES USING TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    • Marissa Harjoe ;
    • David T. Hanson ;

    THU-626

    STEM CONTRIBUTION TO NET PHOTOSYNTHESIS IN POPULUS DELTOIDES USING TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Marissa Harjoe, David T. Hanson.

    The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.

    Understanding the role of stems in whole-plant photosynthesis allows us to maximize plant productivity, affecting their use in agriculture and the storage of atmospheric carbon as biomass. It is accepted that green stems are capable of conducting photosynthesis, but their contribution to the total energy budget is poorly understood. By determining chlorophyll concentration and exchange rates of gasses in both leaves and stems, we are able to evaluate photosynthetic rates on a per chlorophyll basis. Using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), we can detect accurate isotopic concentrations of C12 and C13 at the order of parts per billion. This technique is more precise than others, and the differential use of the isotopologues of CO2 can be used to calculate the resistance to diffusion into leaves and stems. In addition, it has been difficult in the past to assess with accuracy the contribution of stems to whole plant photosynthesis because net stem photosynthesis is small. Gross photosynthesis has been evaluated by taking the difference in CO2 flux in light and dark to account for respiration, introducing error as respiration varies throughout the day. By modifying the isotopic composition of the gas we supply leaves we can alleviate these errors as both respiration and photosynthesis are measured simultaneously. Through TDLAS, we compare the photosynthetic behavior of leaves and stems in Populus deltoides, expecting to discover that these plants realize a sizable portion of net energy budget from stem photosynthesis, shifting current knowledge of whole-plant carbon assimilation.

    THU-634 CHARACTERIZATION OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC PRODUCTIVITY AND GROWTH IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA MUTANTS

    • Linh Pham ;
    • Stefanie Tietz ;
    • David Kramer ;

    THU-634

    CHARACTERIZATION OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC PRODUCTIVITY AND GROWTH IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA MUTANTS

    Linh Pham1, Stefanie Tietz2, David Kramer2.

    1Humboldt State University, Arcata, CA, 2Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

    Changes in environmental conditions, such as water availability, CO2 concentration, and light intensities, can trigger regulatory mechanisms in plants’ photosynthesis that compete with photosystem II’s (PSII) photochemistry (ɸII) for light energy. Differences in light intensities, for example, can activate the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) mechanisms of PSII: photoprotection via heat dissipation (qE) and photoinhibition (qI), in which part or all of PSII is damaged. To study the relationship between photochemistry, NPQ components, and plants’ growth, we grew 6 A.Thaliana T-DNA knockout mutants under flat and fluctuating light intensity chambers for 15 days. On the final day, mutants’ ɸII and NPQ were measured using a fluorometer, and their biomasses were taken. In addition, the light chambers, equipped with light probes and cameras, produced images that were indicative of the plants' ɸII and NPQ throughout the experiment. In all of our mutants, different photosynthetic phenotypes were observed under flat and fluctuating light. Under fluctuating light, higher amounts of qE compared to qI (qE/qI) appeared to be related to higher biomass in plants, and 4 of the 6 mutants also seemed to have ɸII that may be attributable to their qE/qI. Further investigation into these trends may reveal interesting mechanisms of energy dissipation in these mutants. Studying these mechanisms and how they may contribute to higher biomass for plants under fluctuating light could possibly be the key to improving food and biofuel production in the rapidly changing climate.

    FRI-625 USING GENETIC VARIABILITY AND POPULATION DEMOGRAPHICS TO STUDY EFFECTIVE POPULATION SIZE IN LEEDY'S ROSEROOT (RHODIOLA INTEGRIFOLIA SSP. LEEDYI)

    • Ameer Noureldin ;
    • Joel Olfelt ;

    FRI-625

    USING GENETIC VARIABILITY AND POPULATION DEMOGRAPHICS TO STUDY EFFECTIVE POPULATION SIZE IN LEEDY'S ROSEROOT (RHODIOLA INTEGRIFOLIA SSP. LEEDYI)

    Ameer Noureldin, Joel Olfelt.

    Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL.

    Data on the demographics and genetic variability of populations are useful for the purposes of monitoring the viability of populations and making management decisions. Leedy’s roseroot (Rhodiola integrifolia ssp. leedyi) is a rare and endangered species with a total of 7 populations in Minnesota, New York, and South Dakota. Its close relative, R. integrifolia ssp. integrifolia is widespread in North America and is useful for comparison with Leedy’s roseroot populations. Work on the demographic and genetic characteristics of Leedy’s roseroot populations has been ongoing, and our goal is to extend the demographic data to include information from 2015, and to expand the number of microsatellite regions investigated from 8 to 10 or more. Censuses were done by making visual counts of the total number of individuals observed at each Minnesota population, and the size and reproductive status of permanently marked individuals were recorded at 3 of the Minnesota populations. Eleven primers developed for Asian species of Rhodiola were tested for their utility in R. integrifolia, and 3 of the regions were selected for use in 59 individuals from the Minnesota and New York populations, as well as from R. integrifolia ssp. integrifolia from the Western Rockies in Montana and Wyoming. This study compares populations from New York, Minnesota, and the Western Rockies to each other. To date, we have successfully genotyped 34 individuals for all 3 regions. We will continue genotyping individuals from the populations and will analyze our data to estimate the effective sizes of the Leedy’s roseroot populations.

    FRI-634 XANTHOMONAS CAMPESTRIS PV. VITIANS SENSITIVITY TO BACTERIOPHAGES FROM SOIL AND WATER IN LETTUCE PRODUCTION FIELDS

    • Gabriel Ramos ;
    • Carolee Bull ;
    • Mary Dominguez ;

    FRI-634

    XANTHOMONAS CAMPESTRIS PV. VITIANS SENSITIVITY TO BACTERIOPHAGES FROM SOIL AND WATER IN LETTUCE PRODUCTION FIELDS

    Gabriel Ramos1, Carolee Bull2, Mary Dominguez1.

    1Hartnell College, Salinas, CA, 2United States Department of Agriculture, Salinas, CA.

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians (Xcv), the causal agent of bacterial leaf spot in lettuce, causes lettuce yield reduction worldwide. Bacteriophages are potential biological control agents and tools for characterizing the diversity of Xcv. Three bacteriophages; XcvP11, XcvP12, and XcvP13; were used to evaluate sensitivity of various genotypes of Xcv. Bacteriophage sensitivity was evaluated for Xcv strains from a broad geographic distribution. Lysis was recorded for bacteriophage samples (5 μl) pipetted onto solidified soft agar containing test bacteria and poured over nutrient agar. Sensitivity of Xcv to the bacteriophages was related to the genotype of the pathogen. All the strains tested in 2 genotypes (E and D) were lysed, whereas for one genotype (A), none of the strains were lysed. Approximately 81 and 45 percent of strains of types B1 and B2, respectively, were sensitive to the bacteriophages. For individual Xcv strains, reactions were consistent for all 3 bacteriophages. In order to use bacteriophages for disease management, bacteriophage mixtures will be needed to cover Xcv diversity. Xcv strains not lysed by XcvP11, 12, and 14 will be used as hosts to isolate additional bacteriophages to use in mixtures.

    THU-624 UNDERSTANDING REGULATORY DNA IN PLANTS THROUGH MOLECULAR CLONING AND TRANSIENT TRANSFORMATION

    • Cesar Juarez ;
    • John Fowler ;
    • Zuzana Vejlupkova ;

    THU-624

    UNDERSTANDING REGULATORY DNA IN PLANTS THROUGH MOLECULAR CLONING AND TRANSIENT TRANSFORMATION

    Cesar Juarez, John Fowler, Zuzana Vejlupkova.

    Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR.

    Transcriptional regulation controls the expression of genes within eukaryotic cells. Nearby regulatory regions of DNA turn genes on or off during transcription to produce desired proteins. The objective of this study is to understand how genes are regulated in maize pollen through associated regulatory DNA. The generation of novel plasmid constructs that allow rapid and efficient testing of predicted regulatory DNA will enhance the analysis of regulatory DNA functions. The initial goal of this project is to generate such a plasmid, which will allow use of golden gate cloning to place any hypothesized region of regulatory DNA near a fluorescent reporter gene (tdTomato). In the second phase of the project, a set of constructs derived from this new plasmid, each with distinct putative regulatory DNA fragments, will be generated. These constructs will then be transiently transformed into maize pollen grains and leaf cells to test whether the predicted regulatory DNA affects the transcription of the tdTomato fluorescent protein. Any such effects can be assessed via quantitative imaging of tdTomato fluorescence in individual cells in a microscope. The success of this project can improve our understanding of the control of gene expression in plants, potentially allowing manipulation for expression of agricultural beneficial traits.

    THU-633 NITROGEN AND RHIZOBIUM INTERACTIONS IN LEGUME PLANTS

    • Kevin Shanks ;
    • Kristy Duran ;

    THU-633

    NITROGEN AND RHIZOBIUM INTERACTIONS IN LEGUME PLANTS

    Kevin Shanks, Kristy Duran.

    Adams State University, Alamosa, CO.

    Nitrogen is a highly significant nutrient used by plants that is essential for many cellular and molecular functions. Nitrogen is acquired from the roots of the plant as nitrate and taken into the plant with water. Some plants form an association with symbiotic bacteria that are able to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere and are housed within nodules formed on the host root. This study examines whether the symbiotic relationship that a species of legume, Phaseolus vulgaris, has with Rhizobia affects the hydraulic conductivity of its roots in high-nitrate versus low-nitrate environments. A split-root system experiment was used to examine the differential uptake of high- and low-nitrate solutions. Ten plants were inoculated with the Rhizobia bacteria and 10 were not. Five plants of each treatment were grown for 2 weeks after germination, and the other 5 plants of each treatment were grown for 4 weeks after germination before subjected to the split-root experiment. The results showed that 2-week seedlings from both inoculated and uninoculated plants took up more of the low nitrogen solution. In the 4-week seedlings, the inoculated plants continued to take up the low nitrate solution; however, the uninoculated plants took up more of the high nitrate solution. The different results can be explained by the relationship of the Rhizobia bacteria with the inoculated bean plants .The lack of relationship in the uninoculated plants may have caused a stimulus that mediated the switch from the low nitrate solution to the high nitrate solution.

    THU-625 BRYOPHYTES: POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF BIODIVERSITY IN FOREST COMMUNITIES AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    • Anthony Flores ;
    • Maha Khan ;
    • Thomas Campbell ;
    • Charlie DeLavoi ;
    • Matt von Konrat ;

    THU-625

    BRYOPHYTES: POTENTIAL INDICATORS OF BIODIVERSITY IN FOREST COMMUNITIES AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    Anthony Flores1, Maha Khan1, Thomas Campbell1, Charlie DeLavoi2, Matt von Konrat2.

    1Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL, 2Department of Botany, The Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL.

    Found almost everywhere in the world, bryophytes have been proposed as potential indicators of forest health and integrity due to their ability to detect, and reliance on, environmental changes. From an evolutionary and physiological point of view, bryophytes are susceptible to minimal changes in climate. As a result, we may be able to infer trends about the health of forests and surrounding areas based on the quality and diversity of bryophytes found in these areas. This is a preliminary study of a long-term research project seeking to correlate environmental and climatic conditions, past and present, with historical and current bryophyte surveys from 2 different forested areas in northern Illinois. We catalogued 603 unique species of bryophytes occurring in the Midwestern United States. Specifically from our local region, we recorded 295 species from our study sites and compared their distribution patterns with climate data. By observing the differential distribution of species, we hope to determine the relative utility of using bryophytes as environmental indicators of forest health and integrity and also to contribute to the community through awareness and understanding of the ecological and economic relevance of bryophytes.

    THU-627 MONTANE ORCHIDS STEAL FROM THEIR NEIGHBORS, BUT ARE THEY HARMFUL

    • Anita Enriquez ;
    • D. Lee Taylor ;

    THU-627

    MONTANE ORCHIDS STEAL FROM THEIR NEIGHBORS, BUT ARE THEY HARMFUL

    Anita Enriquez, D. Lee Taylor.

    The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.

    Mycorrhizal symbioses are ubiquitous in plants and impact the growth, community composition, and responses to stress and climate change of vegetated ecosystems. The Orchidaceae contains 50% of all plants that have lost photosynthesis. This adaptation is likely facilitated by mycoheterotrophy, an unusual and exploitative mycorrhizal relationship in which plants obtain sugars from mycorrhizal fungi. Corallorhiza striata is an obligately mycoheterotrophic orchid that possesses no chlorophyll and is reliant upon fungi, which are mycorrhizally connected to neighboring trees, for nutrients and carbon. Upon tricking the fungus into infecting the rhizome, the orchid dismantles the fungus to gain resources. We are carrying out the first test of whether mycoheterotrophy negatively impacts the host fungus or tree. Orchid rhizomes and seedpods were collected in 2 New Mexico mountain ranges. Fungal DNA sequences will be added to a larger study of genetic variation in the fungi associated with C. striata. Fungi were cultured directly from C. striata tissue, and used to inoculate conifer seedlings growing in thin glass chambers (microcosms). Once ectomycorrhizae are established, viable orchid seeds will be sown directly into half of the microcosms, while killed orchids seeds will be sown into the remaining half. Above- and below-ground conifer biomass and fungal abundance will be compared across treatments to determine the fitness impacts of mycoheterotrophy. Orchids possess a unique ability to lure and destroy fungi. Understanding the evolutionary principles and physiological mechanisms underlying these abilities could be applied to fighting fungal pathogens in plants, animals, and humans.

    THU-632 ESSENTIAL OILS EXHIBITED INSECTICIDE ACTIVITY AGAINST THE COFFEE BERRY BORER HYPOTHENEMUS HAMPEI (CURCULIONIDAE)

    • Elisa Ramos-Camacho ;
    • Ileana Rodriguez ;

    THU-632

    ESSENTIAL OILS EXHIBITED INSECTICIDE ACTIVITY AGAINST THE COFFEE BERRY BORER HYPOTHENEMUS HAMPEI (CURCULIONIDAE)

    Elisa Ramos-Camacho, Ileana Rodriguez.

    University of Puerto Rico in Humacao, Humacao, PR.

    The coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei is the main pest affecting coffee crops worldwide level. This beetle infects 12 commercial species belonging to the genus Coffea. Currently, the insecticides mainly used for the control of this pest are highly toxic to human health and the environment due to their slow degradation in soil. Our main objective in this project is to develop safer strategies (natural insecticides, deterrents, and attractants) to combat this pest. Previous research has shown the insecticidal activity of essential oil extracted from Ylang-ylang leaves (Cananga odorata) against the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais. Since S. zeamais and H. hampei belong to the family Curculionidae, we tested the potential insecticide activity of C. Ododata. We also tested the insecticide activity of Syzygium aromaticum, Cinnamomun zeylanicum, Callistemon citrinus, and Illisium verum components against the coffee berry borer. In order to perform this task, we obtained the essential oils from flowers, seeds, or leaves of the plants mentioned above by hydrodistillation. To this point, the research suggests that the essential oil of C. odorata could become a prospective organic insecticide against H. hampei.

    FRI-627 DEVELOPMENT OF A PHENOLOGICAL SURVEY PROGRAM FOR TREES ON THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON CAMPUS

    • Cristina Muego ;
    • Ignacio Vera Jr. ;
    • Sean Stepanian ;
    • Darren Sandquist ;

    FRI-627

    DEVELOPMENT OF A PHENOLOGICAL SURVEY PROGRAM FOR TREES ON THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, FULLERTON CAMPUS

    Cristina Muego, Ignacio Vera Jr., Sean Stepanian, Darren Sandquist.

    California State University, Fullerton, Fullerton, CA.

    The goal of this project was to develop the methodology for establishing a long-term phenological database of the trees on campus to aid in the monitoring of their health over time. Phenology is the study of life-cycle timing and stages (e.g., timing of flower development in the spring), which are often influenced by changes in climate. Global changes such as climate warming (a hot topic in current news) provided further motivation for determining how such changes could be affecting the 115 tree species on our own CSUF campus. To monitor the trees, a standardized worksheet was created to document the timing of important phenological phases such as leaf color change and flowering. Monitoring was performed on a quarterly basis. To date, 3 seasons of data have been collected. For each period, 78 of the 115 tree species on campus were observed, with at least 62 having ≥10% of the population represented. This study has established a baseline for long-term future studies as part of the botany curriculum at California State University, Fullerton. Our next objective is to develop higher resolution monitoring of individual campus trees using citizen science approaches.