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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • Food Sciences/Technology

    THU-216 HEAT TREATMENTS OF ANISAKIS SIMPLEX INFECTING EUROPEAN HAKE (MERLUCCIUS MERLUCCIUS L.) FILLETS

    • Sky Myers ;
    • Isabel Sanchez-Alonso ;
    • Cristina De las Heras ;
    • Mercedes Careche ;

    THU-216

    HEAT TREATMENTS OF ANISAKIS SIMPLEX INFECTING EUROPEAN HAKE (MERLUCCIUS MERLUCCIUS L.) FILLETS

    Sky Myers1, Isabel Sanchez-Alonso2, Cristina De las Heras2, Mercedes Careche2.

    1Spelman College, Atlanta, GA, 2Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Alimentos y Nutricion, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid, ES.

    Anisakis infection in fish is highly recognized by fish sector and food safety authorities. The parasite nematodes reach sexual maturity in marine mammals; fish and cephalopods act as intermediate hosts for the third stage larvae (L3). Humans are accidental hosts. Consumption of L3 by humans in raw and undercooked fish and cephalopods may cause gastroallergic symptoms and allergic sensitization (anisakiasis). Anisakis L3 are moderately resistant to heat; therefore, it is important to monitor the point at which the parasites are no longer infective. If undercooked, the likeliness of anisakiasis is increased and, if overcooked, the quality of the fish may be adversely affected. This study aimed to analyze the effects of final heating temperatures to find the minimal treatment needed to kill Anisakis simplex in hake fillets. Temperatures of 50, 60, and 70 ºC were used to heat isolated larvae and artificially infected fish. Mobility of the larvae was assayed, UV fluorescence was observed, and oxygen consumption rates were measured. The in vitro agar penetration test was used to identify the infectivity of the larvae surviving thermal treatments. Results showed 14% mobility after 50 ºC and less than 5% being able to penetrate in agar. After 60 ºC, 2.3% were mobile and 0% were able to penetrate in agar. The oxygen consumption of treated larvae was 64% lower than untreated. These results support the legislation recommendation for cooking fish products at a core temperature of more 60 ºC for at least 1 minute to inactivate L3 Anisakis.

    FRI-216 MONITORING THE QUALITY OF EUROPEAN HAKE (MERLUCCIUS MERLUCCIUS L.) FILLETS AT DIFFERENT FREEZING CONDITIONS KNOWN TO INACTIVATE ANISAKIS LARVAE

    • KayCei Moton- Melancon ;
    • Isabel Sanchez-Alonso ;
    • Cristina De las Heras ;
    • Mercedes Careche ;

    FRI-216

    MONITORING THE QUALITY OF EUROPEAN HAKE (MERLUCCIUS MERLUCCIUS L.) FILLETS AT DIFFERENT FREEZING CONDITIONS KNOWN TO INACTIVATE ANISAKIS LARVAE

    KayCei Moton- Melancon1, Isabel Sanchez-Alonso2, Cristina De las Heras2, Mercedes Careche2.

    1Spelman College, Atlanta, GA, 2Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Alimentos y Nutricion, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid, ES.

    Anisakis simplex is a parasitic nematode which can accidentally infect humans that consume raw or undercooked infected fish. Freezing of fish is one of the methods that kills Anisakis larvae, but it is important to define with precision at which point the parasites are no longer infective, since a too-short treatment may lead to health problems, but a too-extensive treatment may cause quality problems and economic losses. The objective of this work was to study the quality of hake (Merluccius merluccius L.) muscle affected by freezing conditions previously found sufficient to inactivate Anisakis. Fillets were frozen at three different freezing rates up to -20 ºC in the thermal center. They were kept at this temperature and analyzed after 24 hours and 7 days. Low-field nuclear magnetic sesonance and water holding capacity were monitored as measurements of fish quality. Anisakis simplex viability of artificially infected fish treated under these freezing conditions was also evaluated. For that, pepsin digestion, ultraviolet light recovery, mobility of larvae, and agar penetration tests were monitored. Finally, a sensory triangular test was performed to test consumers’ abilities to distinguish between fresh and frozen fish. Results showed faster freezing rates maintained the quality of the fish while effectively eliminating the Anisakis. There were significant differences between fresh and frozen fish, so at least 22% of the consumers can distinguish this difference with a 95% confidence level. These results can help in refining current fishery legislation and increasing marketability of fish.

    THU-217 VALIDATION OF GOLD NANOPARTICLE DNA-BASED BIOSENSORS FOR THE DETECTION OF NON-PCR AMPLIFIED BACTERIAL FOOD-BORNE PATHOGENS IN FOOD MATRICES

    • Masson Blow ;
    • Sylvia Vetrone ;
    • Evangelyn Alocilja ;

    THU-217

    VALIDATION OF GOLD NANOPARTICLE DNA-BASED BIOSENSORS FOR THE DETECTION OF NON-PCR AMPLIFIED BACTERIAL FOOD-BORNE PATHOGENS IN FOOD MATRICES

    Masson Blow1, Sylvia Vetrone1, Evangelyn Alocilja2.

    1Whittier College, Whittier, CA, 2Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI.

    The prospect of bioterrorism in food has identified critical needs in the prevention, protection, and mitigation of food sources for homeland security. Our DNA-based biosensors, which use gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for signal amplification and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for easy and clean separation from samples, has been shown to detect non-PCR-amplified genomic DNA targets (DNAt) from bacterial pathogens within liquid food matrices. Therefore, we hypothesize that our biosensor can also detect pathogenic DNAt in solid food matrices. We spiked 4 food matrices (chicken, spinach, egg yolks, and dog biscuits) with S. Enteritidis, E. coli, S. Enteritidis plus E. coli, or water, and then extracted genomic DNAt. These DNAt samples were then hybridized into a sandwich-like structure consisting of MNPs/DNAt/AuNPs, where both nanoparticles contained probes specific for the insertional element (Iel) of S. Enteritidis. The sandwich structures were then placed onto screen-printed carbon electrodes to detect the voltammetric peaks of gold using differential pulse voltammetry. Despite some high background noise, the findings indicate that our biosensor was able to detect non-PCR amplified S. Enteritidis genomic DNAt from the spiked chicken and spinach samples, but not egg yolk or dog biscuits, as indicated by higher (p ≤ 0.05) gold voltammetric peaks from S. Enteritidis-spiked DNAt samples compared to samples spiked with E. coli or water. These findings suggest that our DNA-based biosensor can serve as a means to detect bacterial food pathogens from some solid food matrices. Future work will determine if it can be used in a field non-laboratory setting.