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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • THU-216 HEAT TREATMENTS OF ANISAKIS SIMPLEX INFECTING EUROPEAN HAKE (MERLUCCIUS MERLUCCIUS L.) FILLETS

    • Sky Myers ;
    • Isabel Sanchez-Alonso ;
    • Cristina De las Heras ;
    • Mercedes Careche ;

    THU-216

    HEAT TREATMENTS OF ANISAKIS SIMPLEX INFECTING EUROPEAN HAKE (MERLUCCIUS MERLUCCIUS L.) FILLETS

    Sky Myers1, Isabel Sanchez-Alonso2, Cristina De las Heras2, Mercedes Careche2.

    1Spelman College, Atlanta, GA, 2Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Alimentos y Nutricion, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid, ES.

    Anisakis infection in fish is highly recognized by fish sector and food safety authorities. The parasite nematodes reach sexual maturity in marine mammals; fish and cephalopods act as intermediate hosts for the third stage larvae (L3). Humans are accidental hosts. Consumption of L3 by humans in raw and undercooked fish and cephalopods may cause gastroallergic symptoms and allergic sensitization (anisakiasis). Anisakis L3 are moderately resistant to heat; therefore, it is important to monitor the point at which the parasites are no longer infective. If undercooked, the likeliness of anisakiasis is increased and, if overcooked, the quality of the fish may be adversely affected. This study aimed to analyze the effects of final heating temperatures to find the minimal treatment needed to kill Anisakis simplex in hake fillets. Temperatures of 50, 60, and 70 ºC were used to heat isolated larvae and artificially infected fish. Mobility of the larvae was assayed, UV fluorescence was observed, and oxygen consumption rates were measured. The in vitro agar penetration test was used to identify the infectivity of the larvae surviving thermal treatments. Results showed 14% mobility after 50 ºC and less than 5% being able to penetrate in agar. After 60 ºC, 2.3% were mobile and 0% were able to penetrate in agar. The oxygen consumption of treated larvae was 64% lower than untreated. These results support the legislation recommendation for cooking fish products at a core temperature of more 60 ºC for at least 1 minute to inactivate L3 Anisakis.