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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • Nutritional Sciences

    THU-203 INTERACTION BETWEEN FRUCTOSE CONSUMPTION AND THE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF COCAINE IN DROSOPHILA

    • Lilian Coie ;
    • Niall Murphy ;

    THU-203

    INTERACTION BETWEEN FRUCTOSE CONSUMPTION AND THE BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF COCAINE IN DROSOPHILA

    Lilian Coie, Niall Murphy.

    University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

    Animals are motivated toward stimuli adaptive to survival. The neural systems impacted by these natural motivators are also impacted by artificial rewards such as drugs of abuse. The common neurochemical mediator of these motivators is believed to be dopamine. Recent evidence suggests that food chronically impacts dopamine function via insulin, a signaling molecule typically considered important in metabolism. In particular, evidence suggests insulin not only acts in the body, but also the brain, where it impacts dopamine transporters, the very molecules blocked by cocaine to induce increased synaptic dopamine. These lines of evidence predict that diet could impact cocaine sensitivity. Overconsumption of modern Western diets is well-known to cause insulin resistance, which is connected to their high sugar content. We examined the interaction between a high fructose diet and the ability of cocaine to disrupt the natural tendency of flies to climb upwards (a behavior termed negative geotaxis) in response to startle. Specifically, we will present studies addressing the hypothesis that Drosophila fed a high fructose diet will show increased susceptibility to cocaine, based on the notion that by inducing insulin resistance such diets would impair dopamine transporter function, leading to impaired behavior.

    FRI-203 METABOLITES OF BLUEBERRY POLYPHENOLS IMPROVE NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION AND SUPPRESS REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN LIPOTOXICITY INDUCED HUMAN AORTIC ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    • Nathan Begaye ;
    • Anadh Velayutham ;

    FRI-203

    METABOLITES OF BLUEBERRY POLYPHENOLS IMPROVE NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION AND SUPPRESS REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN LIPOTOXICITY INDUCED HUMAN AORTIC ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Nathan Begaye, Anadh Velayutham.

    The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

    Human studies support the vascular benefits of blueberry anthocyanins and suggest that this might be mediated by their circulating phenolic metabolites. However this mechanism has not been identified because many of these metabolites are not commercially available. We synthesized the blueberry metabolites such as vanillic acid-4-sulfate (V4S), isovanillic acid-3-sulfate (IV3S) and benzoic acid-4-sulfate (B4S) and characterized them by NMR and mass spectrometry. Recently, we reported that blueberry metabolites (BB-metabolites) at physiologically relevant concentrations suppress high fat induced endothelial inflammation in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). To understand the underlying mechanism, in our current study we investigated whether BB-metabolites improve nitric oxide production (NO) and suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high-fat-induced HAEC. HAEC were treated with ± BB-metabolites cocktail for 6 h and ±500 μ palmitate for the last 5 h. The BB-metabolites cocktail contained V4S, IV3S, B4S, hydroxyhippuric acid, and hippuric acid at concentrations reported to peak in the blood plasma 4 - 6 h after consuming 240 g of blueberries in humans. To determine insulin stimulated NO production, HAEC were treated with 100 nM insulin for the last 30 min. ROS and NO were assessed by H2DCFDA and DAF-FM, respectively. Palmitate treatment significantly increased ROS and reduced insulin stimulated NO in HAEC. However, BB-metabolites significantly suppressed ROS (p < 0.05) and improved NO production (p < 0.05) in HAEC. These data suggest that supplementation of blueberries may prevent vascular complications in metabolic syndrome.

    FRI-207 COMPARATIVE ANALYSES OF BEVERAGE CONSUMPTION IN THE PUERTO RICAN ADULT POPULATION

    • Sheilyann Roldan Fontanez ;
    • Nichole Sanchez ;
    • Javier Arce ;

    FRI-207

    COMPARATIVE ANALYSES OF BEVERAGE CONSUMPTION IN THE PUERTO RICAN ADULT POPULATION

    Sheilyann Roldan Fontanez, Nichole Sanchez, Javier Arce.

    University of Puerto Rico in Cayey, Cayey, PR.

    Obesity and diabetes are public health problems in Puerto Rico. Previous studies link the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to obesity, excess weight, and diabetes. The purpose of the study is to investigate the beverage consumption in the adult rural population of Puerto Rico. We conducted 146 interviews between June and August of 2012. The participants answered a questionnaire with questions about self-reported weekly beverage consumption and perceptions of water quality. We statistically analyzed our data and compared our results to previous studies published in the U.S. and Latin America. As observed in minority groups in the U.S. and Mexicans, our study group consumed an average of more than 500 kcal a day from beverages. Our study suggests that Puerto Ricans are consuming extreme levels of high-caloric beverages which may be contributing to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes.

    THU-207 THE USE OF MEDICINAL BOTANICALS, INCLUDING TOBACCO, BY NORTH AMERICAN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS OF VARYING ETHNICITIES

    • Mariam Zunnu Rain ;
    • Sarah Alkholy ;
    • Maria Pontes Ferreira ;

    THU-207

    THE USE OF MEDICINAL BOTANICALS, INCLUDING TOBACCO, BY NORTH AMERICAN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS OF VARYING ETHNICITIES

    Mariam Zunnu Rain1, Sarah Alkholy2, Maria Pontes Ferreira1.

    1Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, 2College of Education for Girls in Al Leith, Umm al-Qura University, Mecca, SA.

    The use of medicinal botanicals is a traditional part of various cultures globally. There is not enough research focused on the use of medicinal botanicals by university students of different ethnicities, especially Natives/Aboriginals. The purpose of this study is to analyze student use of medicinal botanicals across ethnicities. We hypothesized that overall use of medicinal botanicals, including tobacco, varies across ethnicity and that students of different ethnicities use different botanicals. This cross-sectional study was designed to analyze the use of tobacco and different botanicals by participants. A total of 1,684 students were surveyed: 963 from U.S. and 721 from Canadian universities. Chi-squared analysis using Fisher's exact test (Monte Carlo when cell expected count < 5) was performed using SPSS software to determine correlations. A significant relationship (x2(4) = 17.188, p = 0.002) with an effect size of 10.1% (Cramer's V = 0.101, p = 0.002) was found relating overall botanical use to ethnicity. Among participants who use botanicals, a significant relationship was found (x2(21) = 90.028, p < 0.001), with an effect size of 13.5% (Cramer's V = 0.135, p < 0.001) depicting that the types of botanicals used vary over ethnicity. Another significant relationship (x2(4) = 98.630, p < 0.001), with an effect size of 24.4%, (Cramer's V = 0.244, p < 0.001) is that tobacco use relates to ethnicity. This study suggests that the overall use of medicinal botanicals and the type of botanicals used are related to ethnicity. This provides a basis for future research involving Native/Aboriginal and mainstream student use of botanicals including tobacco.