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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • Education Research/Admin. (Except Educ./School Psychology)

    THU-927 THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY CULTURAL WEALTH THROUGH DUAL-ENROLLMENT PROGRAMS INVOLVING AFRICAN AMERICAN AND LATINO MALE COLLEGE STUDENTS IN STEM EDUCATION

    • Humberto Alanis ;
    • Angela Valenzuela ;

    THU-927

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY CULTURAL WEALTH THROUGH DUAL-ENROLLMENT PROGRAMS INVOLVING AFRICAN AMERICAN AND LATINO MALE COLLEGE STUDENTS IN STEM EDUCATION

    Humberto Alanis, Angela Valenzuela.

    The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.

    Researchers predict that over the next 10 years, the U.S. demand for engineers and scientists is expected to increase at a rate 4 times that of any other occupation. This is a growing concern considering that only 15% of U.S. undergraduates obtain a degree in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM), compared to 67% of undergraduates in Singapore, 50% in China, and 48% in France. Although these percentages are even lower for African American and Latino males in the U.S., recent research shows that dual enrollment programs in high schools have shown promise for these demographics in improving their college performance. This study seeks to address the extent to which dual enrollment programs help African American and Latino males pursue and persist in STEM education as well as what forms of capital derive from these programs. Community cultural wealth was used as a theoretical framework to explore the dual enrollment experiences of 8 students enrolled at a public university in the southwestern part of the U.S. Preliminary results show that students developed various forms of capital in dual enrollment programs and were provided with a foundation of necessary skills that have allowed them to pursue and persist in STEM education. In a time of high demand for professionals in STEM and an underrepresentation of African American and Latino males in this field, preliminary data in this study has shown that dual enrollment programs have provided these demographics with capital to be successful in this field.

    FRI-922 FOSTERING SCIENCE IDENTITIES IN UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITIES THROUGH OUTREACH PROGRAMS

    • Mike Lopez ;
    • Noah Finkelstein ;
    • Kathleen Hinko ;
    • Simone Hyater-Adams ;

    FRI-922

    FOSTERING SCIENCE IDENTITIES IN UNDERREPRESENTED MINORITIES THROUGH OUTREACH PROGRAMS

    Mike Lopez1, Noah Finkelstein2, Kathleen Hinko2, Simone Hyater-Adams2.

    1University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO.

    The physics/science identity framework is well defined, and it has been demonstrated that robust science identities are linked to persistence in the sciences. However, it is unclear how students develop a science identity in relation to their racial identity. To address the underrepresentation of minorities in the sciences, particularly physics, this qualitative project studies how racialized identity resources from a physics outreach program can help youth develop science identities. The Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC) program at the University of Colorado Boulder, currently runs an after-school program for K-8 schools for primarily underrepresented minority students. We transcribed focus group video interviews of 4th and 5th grade PISEC students and coded for key terms in the synthesized, racialized identity framework. Our preliminary findings include that all PISEC students express significant interest in science from material resources and feel recognized as science people by others in PISEC. We also demonstrated that the key science identity components and racialized identity resources are co-constructive. From this analysis, we also considered changes to data collection techniques to measure science identity growth in PISEC students. The racialized science identity framework is an effective tool in analyzing PISEC and improving its efforts in fostering science identities in underrepresented minorities.

    THU-922 EXPLORING MULTICULTURALISM THROUGHOUT STEM FIELDS

    • Corita Miles ;
    • Rosalyn Nergon ;
    • Adan Colon-Carmona ;

    THU-922

    EXPLORING MULTICULTURALISM THROUGHOUT STEM FIELDS

    Corita Miles, Rosalyn Nergon, Adan Colon-Carmona.

    University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA.

    Under-represented minority (URM) students are less likely to complete higher education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields than their White counterparts. The disparities are persistent despite the fact that URM students’ intentions to major in STEM, as well as their performance in STEM coursework, do not differ markedly from non-URM students. This highlights the need to understand the social and cultural experiences of URM STEM majors. Moreover, the influence of social dynamics and multiculturalism in the context of the STEM classroom at a highly diverse campus such as the University of Massachusetts Boston are issues that are poorly understood. We hypothesize that a student’s multiculturalism and his/her ability to interact within diverse social networks are key resources predisposing students to effective cross-cultural communication, adaptability, and creativity, qualities known to translate into STEM success. In this study, we focus on the multicultural student STEM experience, their ethno-racial identity and the diversity they are surrounded by from their childhood and into adulthood. Qualitative data obtained from interviews and questionnaires were transcribed and coded using the Dedoose software. The data indicate that multiculturalism plays a major role in an individual’s ability to adapt to their environment, which is an ability needed in all STEM fields A preliminary analysis of the data, suggesting an association between multiculturalism and the success of the URM student in STEM fields, will be presented and discussed.