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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • FRI-718 MULTIPLEXED MEMBRANE BILAYERS ON CARBOXYLATED POLYSTYRENE MICROSPHERES FOR FLOW CYTOMETRY

    • Mirella Galvan-De La Cruz ;
    • Nadiezda Fernandez Oropeza ;
    • Nesia Zurek ;
    • Steven Graves ;
    • Andrew Shreve ;

    FRI-718

    MULTIPLEXED MEMBRANE BILAYERS ON CARBOXYLATED POLYSTYRENE MICROSPHERES FOR FLOW CYTOMETRY

    Mirella Galvan-De La Cruz, Nadiezda Fernandez Oropeza, Nesia Zurek, Steven Graves, Andrew Shreve.

    The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM.

    Lipid membranes hold the contents of cells, help maintain a homeostatic environment within the cell, play an important role in cell signaling, and contain membrane-bound proteins that are the targets of most drugs. The main components of lipid membranes are lipids, sterols, and proteins, all of which work together to provide biological functions. Thus, in the context of developing assay and drug-screening technologies, it is important to study all the components of membranes. The systems currently available to study membranes and membrane proteins in these types of applications have limitations: they are not multiplexable or high throughput and they are not fully biomimetic since they often present portions of membrane proteins removed from their natural membrane environment. These limitations can lead to false positives and negatives during the drug-screening process. For all these reasons, we are developing a high-throughput, multiplexable, biomimetic, membrane-protein assay for flow cytometry. We will present initial work toward these goals showing development and characterization of a lipid bilayer on top of neutrally buoyant, multiplexed, carboxylated polystyrene microspheres. In ongoing work, we are continuing to develop more complex lipid bilayer assemblies for use in multiplexed, peripheral membrane-protein binding assays. This work will serve as a building block to develop multiplexed biomimetic membrane-protein assays for flow cytometry that can be used for drug discovery.