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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • Other Social Sciences

    FRI-931 LA BATALLA INVISIBLE: MEXICAN IMMIGRANT WOMEN AND DOMESTIC WORK IN THE EQUALITY STATE

    • Norma Lira-Pérez ;
    • Lilia Soto ;

    FRI-931

    LA BATALLA INVISIBLE: MEXICAN IMMIGRANT WOMEN AND DOMESTIC WORK IN THE EQUALITY STATE

    Norma Lira-Pérez, Lilia Soto.

    University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY.

    This study focuses on the domestic work that Mexican immigrant women perform and contribute to the affluent, tourist town of Jackson, Wyoming. Our objective is to share personal narratives of domestic workers on their labor. Thus, their lives are placed at the center of the project and analysis. This study is based on 12 interviews conducted with domestic workers; we have completed, transcribed, and coded the interviews. We collected data through case studies and personal narratives and also engaged in participant observation. We applied the intersectionality paradigm, coined by Kimberlé Crenshaw, to critically analyze the womens' lives. Particular areas of interests included how women view their positions and treatment in the workplace. Wage earnings, amount of work hours each week, past employers, and cost of living was quantified. Participant observations consisted of the primary investigator accompanying participants to their workplace. This project aims to present a detailed account of the immigrant waves and experiences that have shaped the town of Jackson, Wyoming, and its wage and labor divisions. While there is an increase in the Latino demographic in both the state of Wyoming and in the nation, it is important to document and record the lives and experiences of these hidden voices.

    THU-931 MEASURING THE UTILITY OF INFANT GRAMMATICAL CATEGORY KNOWLEDGE

    • Katie Khuu ;
    • Lisa Pearl ;

    THU-931

    MEASURING THE UTILITY OF INFANT GRAMMATICAL CATEGORY KNOWLEDGE

    Katie Khuu, Lisa Pearl.

    University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA.

    Children learn much about their native language without explicit instruction. Yet, what exactly are they learning in the early stages of linguistic development? One goal might be to learn knowledge that is useful for understanding the language around them, even if this knowledge is not adult-level knowledge. As a case study, we investigated how children first learn grammatical categories, like nouns and verbs. This process begins around 12 months when children are capable of using 1) distributional cues such as which words appear together, and 2) communicative cues like what utterance types (e.g., questions, statements, or commands) in which words appear. We applied a promising learning strategy using both of these cues to an age-appropriate dataset. To evaluate whether the strategy was successful, we compared the inferred categories to adult categories, like nouns and verbs, and evaluated how useful the inferred categories were. Our main findings are 1) the quantitative comparison against adult categories shows that the learning strategy does not fare as well on an age-appropriate dataset as it did in the original study demonstrating its performance, but 2) the inferred categories still seem to be useful given qualitative and information-theoretic analyses. So, in short, what children would learn with this strategy is not crazy; the knowledge is very useful even if it is not yet the adult-level knowledge. These results can inform expectations about what typically developing children should be able to learn about language early on, and what appropriate evaluations are for assessing when they are (a)typical.

    THU-939 LA LINEA: A HELPLINE FOR LATINO IMMIGRANTS IN CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, ILLINOIS

    • Cristina Chavez ;
    • Lissette Piedra ;

    THU-939

    LA LINEA: A HELPLINE FOR LATINO IMMIGRANTS IN CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, ILLINOIS

    Cristina Chavez1, Lissette Piedra2.

    1Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL 2University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL.

    Latino immigrants are settling in nontraditional areas like Champaign, Illinois, where there have been no previous establishments of this population. Despite that, nontraditional cities like Champaign are gaining an economic boost because of the labor of immigrants, but are not prepared to meet the needs of an increasing population whose main barrier is their language. La Linea is a helpline that was created in an effort to meet legal and language needs among immigrants in the Champaign and nearby areas. The purpose of this study is to find what resources Latino immigrants request the most when calling La Linea. Due to language being a major barrier to Latino immigrants followed by healthcare, we hypothesized that immigrants would request resources in language interpretation and healthcare. Our sample included 45 men and 73 women, for a total number of participants of 118. Notes were taken for each phone call to determine what resources immigrants requested the most. In the end, information about Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was requested most followed by general questions and information about citizenship and immigration. These results could be due to the university YMCA giving referrals to La Linea to immigrants at their workshops regarding DACA. This information is useful because it implies that Latino immigrants living in Champaign County are prioritizing their legal status compared to Latinos who are migrating to rural areas in the southern states of the U.S.

    FRI-939 ELDER ABUSE: FINANCIAL EXPLOITATION AMONG OLDER ADULTS IN THE U.S.

    • Dale Carter ;
    • Jin Kim ;

    FRI-939

    ELDER ABUSE: FINANCIAL EXPLOITATION AMONG OLDER ADULTS IN THE U.S.

    Dale Carter, Jin Kim.

    Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL.

    This study was designed to better our understanding of financial exploitation (FE) among older American adults. We tested the psychometric assets of the Older Adult Financial Exploitation Measure (OAFEM), a client self-report tool. This is a replication study that used the Rasch item-response theory and traditional validation approaches along with the National Crime Victims Survey (NCVS) data obtained from a nationally representative sample of 28,620 households comprising about 49,000 persons 60 or older on the frequency, characteristics, and consequences of criminal victimization in the U.S. The survey is administered by the U.S. Census Bureau (under the U.S. Department of Commerce) on behalf of the Bureau of Justice. Of the participants, 578 individuals 60 and older were financially exploited with theft being the most severe crime. Age, gender, education, and income were measured. People aged 60 - 69 were more likely to be financially exploited than adults age 70 and over. Furthermore, those with high school or some college education and annual incomes of $15,000 were victimized 66% more than persons with less education earning a smaller salary. Finally, when gender is considered, women were taken advantage of more than men. Inferential analysis shows that the 2nd decision rule validates the key measures in percentage differences of 4% and higher over slight percentage differences of the 1st rule by 2 to 4%. The 2nd rule supports the exploitation theory with a 6 cluster conceptual map model that includes thefts and scams, financial victimization, financial entitlement, and coercion.