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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • Traditional Knowledge

    THU-943 CULTURAL PERCEPTIONS AND CHALLENGES FOR AMERICAN INDIANS PARTICIPATING IN CLINICAL RESEARCH RECRUITMENT: A SURVEY FROM A CREST-2 SITE

    • Delilah Robb ;
    • Adam de Havenon ;
    • Alicia Bennett ;
    • Kinga Aitken ;
    • Majersik Majersik ;

    THU-943

    CULTURAL PERCEPTIONS AND CHALLENGES FOR AMERICAN INDIANS PARTICIPATING IN CLINICAL RESEARCH RECRUITMENT: A SURVEY FROM A CREST-2 SITE

    Delilah Robb1, Adam de Havenon2, Alicia Bennett2, Kinga Aitken3, Majersik Majersik2.

    1North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, 2The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 3Stroke Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

    Increased participation by American Indian and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) in clinical research could improve AI/AN health outcomes and generalizability of the research. Cultural beliefs have a strong impact on the willingness of AI/AN to participate in research. We developed a survey with stroke neurologists and Carotid Revascularization and Medical Management for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial (CREST-2) investigators to identify if cultural beliefs in the AI/AN community impact perception and understanding of clinical research and the CREST-2 protocol. Participants were stratified into groups based on AI/AN self-identification and level of education. Likert-scale responses were tested using the Mann Whitney-U test and dichotomous responses with the chi-square test. There were 102 participants: 61% female, mean age 39, and 37% AI/AN. There was a significant difference between AI/AN and non-AI/AN participants when answering questionings about culture, but not between low and high levels of education. AI/AN were more likely to feel connected with their culture and identify that their cultural beliefs affect health care decisions, willingness to join a research study, or accept a lifesaving medical treatment. This data suggests that AI/AN are more likely than non-AI/AN to consider culture when making important health care decisions, such as participating in a clinical research trial. This data supports our hypothesis that cultural beliefs have a strong impact on AI/AN willingness to participate in research and is important for researchers to consider when designing recruitment strategies for research studies in AI/AN populations.