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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • Earth Sciences/Other Physical Sciences

    THU-G49 ADDRESSING THE IMPACT OF ICE SHELF RETREAT ON LOCAL CLIMATE: A CASE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF THE ROSS ICE SHELF RETREAT ON THE SURROUNDING COASTAL AREA

    • Sarah Aarons ;
    • Sarah Aciego ;
    • Paolo Gabrielli ;
    • Barbara Delmonte ;
    • Janne Koornneef ;
    • Anna Wegner ;
    • Molly Blakowski ;

    THU-G49

    ADDRESSING THE IMPACT OF ICE SHELF RETREAT ON LOCAL CLIMATE: A CASE STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF THE ROSS ICE SHELF RETREAT ON THE SURROUNDING COASTAL AREA

    Sarah Aarons1, Sarah Aciego1, Paolo Gabrielli2, Barbara Delmonte3, Janne Koornneef4, Anna Wegner5, Molly Blakowski1.

    1University of Michigan,  Ann Arbor, MI, 2Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 3University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, IT, 4Vrije University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, NL, 5Institut fur Polar-und Meeresforschung, Alfred Wegener Institute, Bremerhaven, DE.

    Ice cores from Antarctica provide valuable records of past climates encompassing hundreds of thousands of years. Recent declines in ice shelf and sea ice extent in polar regions highlight the importance of evaluating variations in local weather patterns due to climate change. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of airborne mineral particles (dust) transported through the atmosphere and deposited on ice sheets and glaciers in Antarctica allows reconstruction of regional and global climatic systems throughout time. We present the first high-time resolution radiogenic isotope data for Holocene dust in a coastal East Antarctic ice core, accompanied with rare earth element (REE) composition, dust concentration, and size distribution of dust during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM)-Holocene transition. We use these combined ice core data to determine dust provenance, with variations indicative of shifts in either dust production, sources, and/or transport pathways. A series of 15 samples from the Taylor Dome (77°47'47'' S, 158°43'26'' E) ice core from 1.8 - 31.5 ka were analyzed. The Holocene dust dataset displays a broad range in isotopic and REE composition, suggesting a shift from long-range transported dust to a more variable, local input related to the retreat of the Ross Ice Shelf following the termination of the LGM. Changes in the dust deposited on coastal Antarctic ice can thus be used to infer an evolving local climate, and we extend this study to include the time period of 0 - 55 ka using ice from a horizontal ice core taken from the Taylor Glacier, the outlet glacier for Taylor Dome.

    FRI-G42 INVESTIGATION OF LAYERED LUNAR MARE FLOWS THROUGH LROC IMAGERY AND TERRESTRIAL ANALOGS

    • Heidi Needham ;
    • Elise Rumpf ;

    FRI-G42

    INVESTIGATION OF LAYERED LUNAR MARE FLOWS THROUGH LROC IMAGERY AND TERRESTRIAL ANALOGS

    Heidi Needham1, Elise Rumpf2.

    1Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Ocean Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 2Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY.

    High resolution images of the lunar surface reveal layered deposits visible within the walls of impact craters interpreted to be sequences of stacked lava flows. The aim of this research is to establish quantitative constraints on the thicknesses of these individual flow units. The motivation for this project is to identify locations hosting intercalated units in paleoregoliths which may preserve snapshots of the ancient solar wind and other extra-lunar particles, ideal sampling localities for future lunar missions. Our approach involves mapping layered outcrops using high-resolution imagery acquired by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) and Narrow Angle Camera (NAC), with constraints on flow unit dimensions provided by Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data. We have measured thicknesses of ~2 to >20 m. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the definition of contacts between adjacent units, primarily because lighting angle and talus commonly obscures contacts and/or prevents lateral tracing of the flow units. To address these issues, we have undertaken a terrestrial analog study using World View 2 satellite imagery of layered lava sequences on Oahu, Hawai`i., which have a resolution comparable to LROC NAC images of 0.5 m. Layered lava sequences were first analyzed in ArcGIS to obtain an estimate of the number and thicknesses of flow units, before going into the field to ground truth the image analysis. The field and remote sensing measurements allowed us to determine the uncertainty on unit thicknesses. This, in turn, provides insight into the accuracy of measurements obtained from the lunar images.