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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • ap056 HISPANIC BALANCED LIVING WITH DIABETES: A LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION FOR UNDERSERVED HISPANICS IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA

    • Ivette Valenzuela ;
    • Kathryn Hosig ;
    • Kerry Redican ;
    • Carlos Evia ;
    • Elena Serrano ;

    n/a

    HISPANIC BALANCED LIVING WITH DIABETES: A LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION FOR UNDERSERVED HISPANICS IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA

    Ivette Valenzuela, Kathryn Hosig, Kerry Redican, Carlos Evia, Elena Serrano.

    Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA.

    U.S. prevalence of diabetes in Hispanics was 12% in 2012 and is expected to be 20% by 2031. In 2012, the total estimated cost of diabetes in U.S. was $245 billion. Lack of community-based interventions that consider barriers related to culture, language, and immigration status increases the risk of complications for people with limited access to healthcare and are living with pre-diabetes or type-2 diabetes. Community-based diabetes education programs delivered in faith-based settings have been successful in improving diabetes self-management. Hispanic Balanced Living with Diabetes (HBLD) is a type-2 diabetes lifestyle intervention designed to improve blood glucose control. A community-based lifestyle education curriculum was translated, interpreted into Spanish, and adapted to Hispanic culture. Preliminary A1C screening and HBLD programs were offered at 2 Catholic churches. Of 67 preliminary screening participants, 59% were female; 49% had A1C >5.7%. Of 30 HBLD program participants, 56% were female and 44% were male. Baseline versus 3-month A1c (mean ± sd) was 6.0 ± 0.5 versus 6.2 ± 0.7 for the delayed control group (n = 10) and 6.4 ± 0.9 versus 6.4 ± 0.9 for the intervention group (n = 11). The difference in A1C change between treatment groups was not statistically significant (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05). HBLD has potential to prevent further increase in A1c among Hispanic participants with pre-diabetes by providing education to those who may not otherwise have access to lifestyle education for type-2 diabetes. Longer-term studies are warranted.