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  • Undergraduate Poster Abstracts
  • Physics (Except Biophysics)

    Room Chesapeake 1

    ap076 CHROMOSPHERIC ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN ACTIVE FLARING REGIONS

    • Teresa Monsue ;
    • Frank Hill ;
    • Keivan Stassun ;

    n/a

    CHROMOSPHERIC ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN ACTIVE FLARING REGIONS

    Teresa Monsue1, Frank Hill2, Keivan Stassun1.

    1Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2National Solar Observatory Integrated Synoptic Program, National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ.

    Chromospheric p-mode oscillations are studied in Hα to obtain helioseismic information regarding the local structural conditions around highly magnetic regions such as sunspots. Solar flares commonly occur in active regions where these sunspots exist, therefore boosting the p-mode power. In our current research analyzing p-modes in the chromosphere, we studied the time evolution of the p-modes from data taken from the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Hα, and investigated the p-modes across the frequency band (1 < n < 8.33 mHz). This study entails 3 active regions directly over sunspots in which flaring activity is taking place from 2 solar flares that occurred on June 13th and July 12th, 2012. Our analysis used time-series data to create Fourier power spectra of individual pixels spatially resolved around the flare region to study the frequency bands. We then studied how the frequency distribution evolves temporally by constructing a power map movie (PMM) of the regions. From these PMMs, we can survey the chromospheric oscillations for each frequency band. We found that the intensity of the flare has an effect on the behavior of the p-modes within different frequency bands. The suppression of power was observed in dark anomalous structures within the PMMs and, in other regions, there was an observed boost in power due to flaring activity.

    ap077 CONTROLLING THE ELECTRON SPIN OF A COLOR CENTER IN DIAMOND

    • Maira Amezcua ;
    • Hailin Wang ;

    n/a

    CONTROLLING THE ELECTRON SPIN OF A COLOR CENTER IN DIAMOND

    Maira Amezcua, Hailin Wang.

    University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.

    Color centers in diamond are naturally occurring defects that give diamond a special tint. For example, a substitutional nitrogen atom can be bound with a nearby vacancy in diamond, forming a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center. NV centers not only give out red fluorescence, but also emerged in recent years as a promising candidate for qubits, 2-level quantum systems that serve as the elementary building blocks of a quantum computer. The electron spin states in a NV center are highly sensitive to the surrounding environment including magnetic fields and temperature, making these spins excellent magnetometers and temperature sensors. In this context, NV centers in diamond nanocrystals have recently been exploited for probing magnetic fields and temperature in biological systems. This presentation will discuss several quantum optics experiments to probe and control how an electron spin in a NV center interacts with its surrounding environment. A particular emphasis of these experiments is to decouple the electron spin from the surrounding nuclear spins such that coherent quantum evolution of the electron can persist without interruptions induced by the carbon nuclear spin bath in the diamond lattice. This protection of the electron spin from dephasing is important for the use of the electron spin as qubits or as magnetic or temperature sensors.

    ap078 SEARCHING FOR LEPTON-VIOLATING Z DECAYS WITH THE ATLAS DETECTOR AT THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER

    • Brady Hood ;
    • Richard Kass ;

    n/a

    SEARCHING FOR LEPTON-VIOLATING Z DECAYS WITH THE ATLAS DETECTOR AT THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER

    Brady Hood, Richard Kass.

    The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will soon be providing data at a center of mass energy of 13 TeV. At this energy, the number of Z bosons produced at the LHC will increase substantially. If rare processes hinting at signs of new physics exist in Z decays, they will be easier to find than before at this new production rate. Lepton number is conserved in the standard model of particle physics; however, several models of physics beyond the standard model allow that conservation to be violated. With this motivation, we search for lepton number violating decays of the Z boson. We present results from a search for an enhancement in the invariant mass spectrum at the new LHC energy of 13 TeV with simulated events generated in ATLAS (a general purpose detector at the LHC). Backgrounds to the reaction are determined and subtracted, and a neural net approach is used to implement a multivariate analysis.

    ap079 UNDERSTANDING BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN STRING THEORY

    • Shaun Hampton ;
    • Samir Mathur ;

    n/a

    UNDERSTANDING BLACK HOLE FORMATION IN STRING THEORY

    Shaun Hampton, Samir Mathur.

    The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

    String theory posits that all fundamental particles are made of tiny vibrating strings and predicts that we live in a universe that contains extra dimensions. Furthermore, it is a leading theory of quantum gravity, something that must be considered when combining quantum mechanics and gravity into a unified framework. An understanding of quantum gravity is essential in developing a complete theory of black holes. Remarkably, string theory can be and has been utilized to determine their internal structure. We now seek to understand black hole formation. We can describe black holes in string theory by looking at a conformal field theory. In this description, we have the twist interaction which joins and unjoins strings, the fundamental objects of our theory. Using what is known as the field theory/gravity duality conjecture, one can ascertain information about one regime by investigating its dual. We have utilized the twist interaction in hopes of finding evidence of thermalization, for which the gravity dual is black hole formation. We previously considered a single twist interaction which took 2 strings and joined them together. We now take 2 strings, join them together with the first twist interaction, and then unjoin them with the second twist interaction. We consider the cases where both strings have no initial modes of vibration, and where 1 of the 2 initial strings contain a single mode of vibration. We calculate the final states of this 2-twist interaction and discuss the connection of these results with the process of thermalization.

    ap080 LANTHANIDE NANOPARTICLES AS MULTIMODAL IMAGING CONTRAST AGENTS

    • Francisco Pedraza III ;
    • Ajith KumarD ;
    • Jing Yong Ye ;
    • Dhiraj Sardar ;

    n/a

    LANTHANIDE NANOPARTICLES AS MULTIMODAL IMAGING CONTRAST AGENTS

    Francisco Pedraza III, Ajith KumarD, Jing Yong Ye, Dhiraj Sardar.

    The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX.

    This project focuses on exploring the near-infrared (NIR) optical and photoacoustic (PA) imaging capabilities of lanthanide-based nanoparticles to determine their potential use as multimodal imaging agents. Although several contrast agents are used for non-invasive NIR optical imaging, most are not capable of providing in-depth information with high signal-to-noise ratio. A way to circumvent this difficulty is to combine multiple imaging modalities. For example, NIR optical imaging is ideal for molecular and cellular imaging due to its tunability and selectivity; however, PA imaging has a superior spatial resolution and penetration depth to that of NIR optical imaging. If a single contrast agent is developed that functions with both imaging modalities, we could take advantage of the individual strengths, ultimately resulting in a more efficient multimodal imaging strategy. Lanthanide-based nanoparticles are perfect candidates for this application due to their excellent NIR spectral properties. By controlling the non-radiative processes through various emission channels, it is possible to generate strong PA signals that would help us explore the wavelength-dependent PA imaging features. For this project, nanoparticles were methodically designed, synthesized, and characterized. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy were then used to identify the crystal structure and morphology along with spectroscopy for optical characterization. Next, a custom PA imaging system was utilized to record the acoustic signal following laser excitation of the nanoparticles. The results suggest that these lanthanide-based nanoparticles can serve as both optical and PA imaging agents. Further studies will examine their biocompatibility and comparison with current contrast agents.